Medical and Health Services Manager Overview

Overall Score 8.1 / 10

What is a Medical and Health Services Manager?

Median Salary
$104,280
Unemployment Rate
2.2%
Number of Jobs
139,600

What is a Medical and Health Services Manager?

Median Salary
$104,280
Unemployment Rate
2.2%
Number of Jobs
139,600
Medical and health services managers are the planners, directors and coordinators who work behind the scenes to keep hospitals, nursing homes, group practices and other health care facilities running efficiently. In short, they are super-organized professionals.

Medical and health services managers are usually extremely detail-oriented people with good analytical skills. Because much of their time is spent working with doctors, health insurance representatives and other administrators, they should also have good interpersonal and communication skills. Problem-solving is another part of the job. Technical skills are also a must because these professionals must keep up-to-date with software and electronic health records.

A high demand for more medical and health services managers is driven by the large baby boomer population needing more health care in hospitals, group practices and nursing homes as they age. It’s also driven by the uptick in group practices and the need for managers and administrators to helm these facilities.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects 32.5 percent employment growth for medical and health services managers between 2020 and 2030. In that period, an estimated 139,600 jobs should open up.
Median Salary
$104,280
Unemployment Rate
2.2%
Number of Jobs
139,600
Medical and health services managers are the planners, directors and coordinators who work behind the scenes to keep hospitals, nursing homes, group practices and other health care facilities running efficiently. In short, they are super-organized professionals.

Medical and health services managers are usually extremely detail-oriented people with good analytical skills. Because much of their time is spent working with doctors, health insurance representatives and other administrators, they should also have good interpersonal and communication skills. Problem-solving is another part of the job. Technical skills are also a must because these professionals must keep up-to-date with software and electronic health records.

A high demand for more medical and health services managers is driven by the large baby boomer population needing more health care in hospitals, group practices and nursing homes as they age. It’s also driven by the uptick in group practices and the need for managers and administrators to helm these facilities.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects 32.5 percent employment growth for medical and health services managers between 2020 and 2030. In that period, an estimated 139,600 jobs should open up.
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Rankings

Medical and Health Services Managers rank #1 in Best Business Jobs. Jobs are ranked according to their ability to offer an elusive mix of factors. Read more about how we rank the best jobs.

8.1

Scorecard

  • 8.1Salary
  • 8Job Market
  • 9Future Growth
  • 4Stress
  • 6Work Life Balance

How Much Does a Medical and Health Services Manager Make?

Medical and Health Services Managers made a median salary of $104,280 in 2020. The best-paid 25 percent made $139,650 that year, while the lowest-paid 25 percent made $78,820.
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How to Become a Medical and Health Services Manager?

To work in a hospital, most medical and health services managers have at least a bachelor’s degree in health administration. However, a master’s degree in an area like public administration, business administration or public health might help open the door to more opportunities.

The vast majority of those who manage smaller practices (with anywhere from one to six doctors) have an associate or trade school certificate. Karen Blanchette, director of the Professional Association of Health Care Office Management, suggests looking for a program affiliated with a national association. PAHCOM’s Academic Credentialing Program, for instance, offers students the ability to prepare and sit for credentialing exams to become Certified Medical Managers. “Their real-world exposure coupled with professional certification makes them a far better employment candidate than those without,” Blanchette says.

Prospective medical and health services managers might also need to acquire their licensure, depending on their workplace. For instance, nursing care facility administrators are required to have licensure; while licensure for those in charge of assisted living facilities will vary by state. Other sectors of medical and health services management don’t require licensure.

Certification isn’t a requirement either, but it’s available through PAHCOM and the College of Health Care Administrators and other associations. Again, though it’s not a requirement, it might help show employers your dedication and seriousness about the profession.

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Job Satisfaction

Average Americans work well into their 60s, so workers might as well have a job that's enjoyable and a career that's fulfilling. A job with a low stress level, good work-life balance and solid prospects to improve, get promoted and earn a higher salary would make many employees happy. Here's how Medical and Health Services Managers job satisfaction is rated in terms of upward mobility, stress level and flexibility.

Upward Mobility
Upward Mobility

Opportunities for advancements and salary

Above Average

Opportunities for advancements and salary

Stress Level
Stress Level

Work environment and complexities of the job's responsibilities

Above Average

Work environment and complexities of the job's responsibilities

Flexibility
Flexibility

Alternative working schedule and work life balance

Average

Alternative working schedule and work life balance

Advice From Real Medical and Health Services Managers »